Words under the lens: 20 Greek words that have been anagrammatized from Turkish

WORDS UNDER THE LENS
 

 

1.    Greek word MSUSTERES meaning "customer", rearranged as "MUSSTERE-S", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596], is an anagrammatized form of Turkish "MÜŞTERI" meaning "customer".

Interestingly, even sthe English word CUSTOMER, when rearranged as "MUSTERO-C", is also an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "MÜŞTERI" meaning "customer".


2.    Greek word MPAMPAKI meaning "cotton", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596], rearranged as "PAMPAKIM" is an anagrammatized form of Turkish "PAMPOKUM" (PAMUGUM)  meaning "I am cotton". Turkish word PAMUK means "cotton". 


3.    Greek word MPALWMA meaning "to patch", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596], with W = YU, rearranged as "YUMALMA-P",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "YAMALAMA" or "YAMALAMA O" meaning "patching" or "it is patching" respectively.   Turkish word YAMA means "patch", YAMALAMAK means "to patch", YAMALA means "patch it", that is, the "command" form of the verb.

Additionally, it can also be deciphered as "UMALAYP-M" which is then is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "YAMALAYUP" meaning "he has patched". 


4.    Greek word MPAKALIKO meaning "grocery", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596], rearranged as "PAKKALIM-O", is an anagrammatized form of Turkish "BAKKALIM O" meaning "it is my grocery store".  Turkish word BAKKAL means "grocer, grocery store". 


5.    Greek word MPAXES (MPAKSES) meaning "garden", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as "PAKSSEM", is an anagrammatized form of the Turkish word "BAGÇEM" (BAHÇEM) meaning "my garden". Turkish BAHÇE (BAGÇE) means "garden". 


6.    Greek word MPAXISI (MPAKSISI) meaning "baksheesh", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as "PAKSISIM" is an anagrammatized form of  Turkish word "BAHŞIŞIM" meaning "I am baksheesh".  Turkish BAHŞIŞ, (supposedly a Persian word) is from Turkish "BAGIŞ" means  "tip,  gift,  present;  a giving". 


7.    Greek word MPASTARDOS meaning "bastard", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as  "PS-DOMASTAR", with S to Ş replacement, and the final S of MPASTARDOS being also a Ç, is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "PIC DOGMUŞTUR" meaning "has born as bastard". Turkish word PIC means "bastard", DOGMUŞTUR means "he/she has born". 


8.    Greek word MPARMPAS meaning "uncle", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as "PR-AMSAM-P" is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "BIR AMCAM O" meaning "he is one of my uncle".  Turkish word BIR means "one", AMCA means "uncle", AMCAM means "my uncle", O means "he".


9.    Greek word MPATSIZW meaning "I slap (in the face)", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  where W = YU,  rearranged as "YUZ-SIMAPT" where symbol P = R in Greek alphabet, and also by way of Caesar Cipher replacement,  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "YÜZE ŞAMARDI" meaning "it is slap on face".  Turkish word YÜZ means "face", YÜZE means "to face",  ŞAMAR means "slap" and ŞAMARDI means "it is slap".


10.    Greek word MPERNTES meaning "curtain", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as "PERTEM-SN", is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word:  a) "PERDEM" meaning "my curtain", or b) "PERDEMSIN" meaning "you are my curtain", or c) "PERDESIN" meaning "you are curtain".  So all of these three variations in Turkish have been combined into one word.  Turkish word PERDE means "curtain".


11.    Greek word MPIZELI meaning "pea", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596], rearranged as "PIZELI-M", is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "BEZELYE" meaning "pea".  Turkish word BEZELYE means "pea", BEZELYEM means "my pea" and BEZELYEEM means "I am pea". 


12.    Greek word MPIRA meaning "beer", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596], rearranged as "PIRA-M" is an anagrammatized form of  Turkish word "BIRAyaM" meaning "I am beer".  Turkish word BIRA also means "beer".   

Actually, it could also be deciphered as "IRPA-M" which would be an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "ARPAyaM" meaning "I am barley".  It is well known that "beer" is made from "barley".  

Even the English word BEER rearranged in the form of "ERBE" is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "ARPA" meaning "barley".  


13.    Greek word MPORDW meaning "I can; I may; I am able", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 597],  where W = YU, rearranged as "YOPRUM" or "YPORUM" is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word "YAPARUM" meaning "I can do, I can make; I may do, I may make; I am able to do, I am able to make " 

Turkish word YAP is the command form of Turkish verb "YAPMAK" meaning "to do, to make".  Thus, YAP means "do, make", YAPAR means "he/she/it can do, he/she/it may do, he/she/it is able to do". 
  

14.    Greek word MPALTAS meaning "hatchet, axe", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as "PALTA-MS" is an anagrammatized form of Turkish word:  a) "BALTA" meaning "axe", or  b)  "BALTAMSI" meaning "like axe".  Hatchet is like an axe 


15.    Greek word MPOUMPOURAS  meaning "bumble bee", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 597],  rearranged as "POMPOM-ARUSU",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "BOMBOM ARUSU" meaning "the bumble bee" 

Presently in Turkish, for "bumblebee" the term "EŞEK ARUSU" (EŞEK ARISI) is used meaning "the donkey bee" probably referring to its huge size.  It is likely that in ancient times Turks could have also used the term "BOMBOM ARUSU".  Turkish ARU (ARI) means "bee", ARUSU (ARISI) means "the bee".


16.    Greek word KABOURDISMA meaning "roasting, frying", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 538],  rearranged as "KABURMADI-O-S",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "KAVURMADI O" meaning "it is roasting, it is frying". Turkish verb "kavurmak" means "to roast, to fry". Thus KAVURMA means "roasting". 


17.    Greek word KABOURDIZW meaning "I roast, I fry", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 538],  where the bogus letter W is UU in this case,  rearranged as "KABURUZUDI-O",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "KAVURUCUDU O" meaning "he is one who roasts, he is one who fries". Turkish verb "kavurmak" means "to roast, to fry". KAVURUCU means "he/she who roasts, fries". 


18.    Greek word MPASTOUNI meaning "stick, cane, club", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 596],  rearranged as "SOPAMTI-U-N",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "SOPAMDI O" meaning "it is my stick, it is my cane, it is my club". Turkish word SOPA means "stick, cane, club"SOPAM means "my stick", SOPAMDI  means "it is my stick". 

Alternatively, the Greek word MPASTOUNI, when rearranged as "PASTONIM-U",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "PASTONUM O" (BASTONUM O) meaning "it is my cane". Turkish word BASTON means "cane". 


19)   Greek word MISTHODOSIA meaning "payment of wages", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 592],  rearranged as "ISHSI-ODATOM",  is an anagrammatized form of Turkish expression "IŞCI-ÖDEDÜM" meaning "I paid workers" which is the same as "payment of wages".  Turkish IŞCI means "worker, wager", ÖDEMEK means "to pay", ÖDE means "pay", that is, its command form, ÖDEDÜM meaning "I paid" 


20)   Greek word MISTHARNW or MISTHARNEW is defined as meaning "I serve for hire", [Divry's English-Greek and Greek-English Dictionary, 1988, p. 592]. The letter W at the end of the word is a replacement for UU combination.  This makes the word as MISTHARNEUU.  When the word MISTHARNEUU is rearranged as "ISHNU-ETARUM",  it is found to be an anagrammatized, disguised and Hellenized form of Turkish expression "IŞINÜ EDERÜM" (IŞINI YAPARIM) meaning "I do your work", "I am paid worker", that is, "I am worker who does work for money".  

Turkish word "" means "work", IŞINÜ means "your work", ETMEK means "to do, to make", EDER means "he/she/it does", EDERÜM means "I do".  So, as it is seen, Turkish is a monosyllabic language in which the words are structured by adding monosyllabic suffixes to a root word, almost like mathematics. 


Last Comments: 

In this exercise, I analyzed and deciphered twenty "Greek" words and I showed conclusively that they have all been anagrammatized from Turkish words and expressions. Although they have been well disguised and presented as Greek words to the world,  their origin is definitely in Turkish. With the applied disfiguration by means of anagrammatizing, the source Turkish linguistic material, that is, Turkish words and expressions, have been alienated and linguistically usurped from Turkish.

These Greek words clearly show that Turkish was the model and the source language for manufacturing not only these Greek words shown in this study, but also countless number of other words of Greek, Latin and other so-called Indo-European and Semitic languages. Since they have done this with many words from Turkish, there is no reason for them to stop there.  Surely, they have manufactured many more words from Turkish as I have been showing in my writings.  

These decipherments show that the technique of "anagram" was widely used by certain groups to manufacture new languages for themselves from Turkish which was the world-wide spoken language of the ancient world, [see GENESIS: 11].  

Some readers have mistakenly raised the view that since such words of the Indo-European languages are made up from Turkish, this discovery may entice some Turks to take these broken up and alienated words back into "Turkish" with the false "excuse" that they are already made up from Turkish.  Of course, such a thinking is total nonsense, and any one who tries to import such alienated words into Turkish must be regarded as being out of his/her mind". Such importations into Turkish would corrupt Turkish and cause its eventual death. That should never happen. In all of my writings, I have never even suggested let alone recommended that such an ill-thought action should take place.  

Those Turkish source words and expressions that certain cultures have used as source for the manufacture of words for their non-authentic languages are already present in the Turkish language and people speak and use them in all kinds of communication purposes. 

Furthermore, showing how the Indo-European languages have been made up from Turkish is one thing, but adopting those alienated and totally restructured words that do not fit anymore into the almost mathematical structure of the Turkish language is another!


Best wishes to all,

Polat Kaya

10/11/2008