Re: [bcn2004] Words under the lens: "APOCALYPTIC", "ESCHATOLOGY", "SCATOLOGY", "ALLEGORIKOS" and "ALLEGORIKON"

Sayin Turhan Tisinli bey,


You said:


Again, no!  They could have used phrases from their own languages to form a name for the Martian feature, and they did...  This is because the words "coprates" and "chasma" existed before they became parts of this name.  

Polat Kaya:  I explained the Turkish source for both "coprates" and  "chasma" which showed that these words were made up from Turkish words by way of anagrammatizing.  There is no word like "COPRATES" in English, Latin or Greek dictionaries. So they did not use "COPRATES" from their own languages. There is the word "CHASM" and "CHASMY" in English supposedly [from Latin chasma from Greek CHASMA], defined as "a deep breach, as in the earth; gorge; canyon, crevasse" which has been made up from Turkish word "KAYMASI" meaning "sliding" and/or even from "KAYMIŞ" meaning "slid" as in landslide.  There are thousands of so-called "Greek" words made up from Turkish like this one is.  No one has known it so until I pointed out.

You said:


And, even if you are right about that the name "coprates chasma" meant "lansslide", 


Polat Kaya:  There is no "may be" about what I said, because I do not write papers based on "maybe's".  I only write after thorough investigation. Therefore, I was sure about what I said.  I said, "COPRATES CHASMA was made up from Turkish expression "TOPRAK KAYMASI" meaning "landslide".

You must understand that they have a very powerful trick in word generation for IE languages.  When they are in need of a new "IE" looking word or name for a new situation, they can readily take a concept-defining expression in Turkish, break it up into its most basic elements, restructure them into a so-called "Greek" or "Latin" format and then define the resulting word as being sourced from Greek and/or Latin.  It's like a plagiarizer manufacturing an alibi to cover up what he took without permission.  With this kind of fancy footwork, no one would know the word was generated from Turkish - let alone suspect it.  Thus, everyone, including the Turks, gets conned into accepting the manufactured word as an "authentic" "IE" word.  So I am afraid you are wrong on all accounts.


You said:
 

they could still have used a phrase from their own languages to form the name...  Here is how:  "landslide" > [ using an anagramatizing algorithm] > "sendadill".  Any objections to this  "sendadill"  !? :-)  And the Brithish conterpart "landslip" would yield something like "sendapill" or sandipall...:-). Any objections to this one?  


Polat Kaya:  Yes plenty of objections.  First of all neither your "LANDSLIDE" nor your manufactured "word" SENDAPILL" or "SANDIPALL" have anything to do with the make up of the name "COPRATES CHASMA".  You cannot rearrange "LANDSLIDE" to come up with "COPRATES" or "CHASMA" or "COPRATES CHASMA".  Therefore, your point is wrong and baseless.  This shows that unfortunately, you have not understood at all any of the sample decipherments I have given so far.  You better read very carefully what I am saying in my examples, and please move out of the influence of what you have been taught about the make up of IE languages. What they are stating in dictionaries as the source of the word(s) is not truthful.

Additionally, they did not use the name "LANDSLIDE" or "SANDIPALL", but used "COPRATES CHASMA" describing a "landslide area" indicating "TOPRAK KAYMASI" in Turkish.

"COPRATES CHASMA" is a name given to an area on Mars where there has been "TOPRAK KAYMASI".  If they had given a name to that area like the one you are suggesting, that is, "SENDAPILL" or "SANDIPALL", then I would agree with you.  But they did not use what you are saying.  So, your suggestion is hypothetical and useless.


You said:


If not,  you should drop your claim that "and their hands are still in the cookie-jar of the Turkish language".

Polat Kaya:  I pointed out my objections to your irrational suggestion. Thus, there is no way that I can drop my claim that "their hands are still in the cookie-jar of the Turkish Language". "COPRATES CHASMA", that is, Turkish  "TOPRAK KAYMASI" is not the only one that they have usurped.  I have given close to a thousand words in this forum as examples, and over the years I have deciphered thousands more that I have not shared with the readers.  Therefore I know what I am talking about.  Those who steal do not openly admit what they did.  Even when they are caught with a video tape, they do not want to admit their crime.

===========
You said: 

"No! "corpates chasma" does not mean landslide, it is the name of the a Martian feature that has a landslide in it. "Corpates" is said to be the old name of the Persian river Ab-i-Diz, and Latin "chasma" is from Greek "khasma" (yawning hollow, gulf)."

Polat Kaya:  Nothing of the kind.  There is nothing more logical and natural than calling a "TOPRAK KAYMASI" by "TOPRAK KAYMASI", that is,  calling a "LANDSLIDE" by "LANDSLIDE".  Only, in this case, they used an anagrammatized Turkish expression defining the "landslide". Furthermore, the so-called Greek "Khasma" is from Turkish "KAYMIŞ".  And the "etymological" information we get in the dictionaries are mostly not the truth.  They are deceptions and coverups of what has taken place. 


You said: 


"I bet what gave you this idea is the word "corpat"es  / "korpat"  X Turkish "toprak" (soil)  (i.e. a result of interchanginhg the first sound of a word by the last sound, which is fairly common. "

Polat Kaya:  If I were you I would not bet on what you say.  Actually, after I examined the talked-about picture from Mars, I recognized that it was the picture of a "landslide", that is, "toprak kaymasi" in Turkish.  When I examined the first word "coprates", I recognized it as an anagram of the Turkish word "toprak".  Whether it is "torpak" or "toprak" would not make any difference in deciphering it.  In either case the source would be Turkish. Of cource, the definition of the "chasma" also fit very well with Turkish  word "kaymasi".  The rest was easy: 2 + 2 always equals  4. 


You said:


"Even some Turkic dialects change this to "torpak". it is possible that the origin is "torpak" rather than "toprak", because "tor" can easily be related to "toz" (dust), "tuz" (salt), and even to "dur" (stand still) (all "settle"...).  [ r > z sound change which is not caused by any priests is possible in Turkish :-)]   


Polat Kaya:  It really does not matter how you twist the words, the source would still be Turkish.  Additionally, "tor", "toz", "tuz", "dur" are Turkish words for different concepts unrelated to "toprak kaymasi".   


You said: 


"Arabic turba and tura:b mean soil too.  If "corpates" had a suitable meaning that could be related to "soil", then it would be  possible to argue that these words have the same origin, either therough genetic relations, or being a loan, etc.  Old Persian "corpates" can be thought of as "toprak su", and this is nothing but a wild guess too... :) "


Polat Kaya:  I am amazed that that you are ready to accept everything else except what I said.  You are even willing to bring in an old Persian "corpates", that is, if there is such a so-called "old Persian" word.  Why is that?  I hope you are not illogically playing the "devil's advocate!" Have you anything against my very logical explanation? 

"Old Persian corpates" or "coprates" could be an anagrammatized word from Turkish "toprak su" providing that it had such a meaning.  I know that you are doing wild guesses with the things you are saying because you do not know what I know and therefore you are just splashing water as a beginner.  But you must understand that I do not work using "wild guesses".  I decipher them logically and properly. 

It really does not matter which way you twist the words, the source would still be Turkish.  That means that Turkish was the model language at that time. 

You said:

Turkish "toprak kayması" is meant to translate the American technical term "lanslide" (1856 A.D.) (Brithish "landslip") which is fairly new.  Geology itself was "invented" in England by a civil engineer called James Hutton (1726-1797).  Now let's remember that seeing an apple fall from the tree is not the same as understanding its and expressing it in a mathematical formula, and giving it a name...


Polat Kaya:  Dear reader, you are wrong on every count! We are not talking about "translation from one language into another", we are talking about "word manufacturing" by way of anagrammatizing Turkish words and phrases into some words that are called "words of Indo-European (IE)" languages - and then deciphering them back to the original Turkish source words and/or phrases that they were made from. So let us not confuse apples and oranges.  Since you do not know what has gone on in manufacturing the so-called IE languages, it would be easier for you to say "I do not know" rather than trying sophistry. When I say IE languages I mean all of them including the so-called "Persian" and even the "Sanskrit".  They have all been manufactured from Turkish.  Because TURKISH was a world-wide spoken language in old times.  

Additionally, you must understand that I do not use translation in my decipherments, but rather I decipher them, that is, I do the opposite of what they have done in the first place in order to come up with the "IE" word.  In modern terminology, it is called 'decryption' of the encrypted words, - a system that is used continuously in modern communication systems in order to provide "secure" transmission to the transmitted information.  Furthermore, Turkish "toprak kaymasi" is not a translation from any language. Both "toprak" and "kayma" are Turkish words and I am sure Turks have experienced "landslide" cases throughout their long history wherever they were. 

Finally, you say that "
Geology itself was "invented" in England by a civil engineer called James Hutton (1726-1797)."  I disagree!  The ancient Turanians (e.g., Sumerians, Masarians, Pelasgians, etc.) all knew about rocks and geology thousands of years ago.  They knew which rocks were hard and which ones weren't.  They knew which rocks were good for building pyramids or houses.   The Inca walls of Peru are magnificent examples of rock understanding by ancient Turanians.  So Geology was not invented in England nor was it Greek!  

To continue, the word GEOLOGY is supposed to be from Greek word GEWLOGIA, [Divry's, 1988,  p. 128, and p. 461]. 

When GEWLOGIA, that is, with the bogus letter W = UU, it becomes GEUULOGIA, is rearranged as "GEIA-OLGU-U", it reveals itself as the Turkish expression  "GAYA OLGU O" (YER OLGU O, KAYA OLGU O)  - meaning "formation of rocks".

Additionally when GEWLOGIA, that is, GEUULOGIA is rearranged as "GEIA-OGULU", it reveals itself as the Turkish expression "GAYA OGULU" (KAYA OKULU, YER OKULU) meaning "school of rock study", "school of earth study".

Finally, when GEWLOGIA, that is, GEUULOGIA is rearranged as  "GEIO-AGULU",  it reveals itself as the Turkish expression"GAYA AGULU" (KAYA AKILI, YER AKILU, KAYA BILGISI, YER BILGISI) meaning "knowledge of rocks" or "knowledge of earth".


These Turkish words and phrases describe three different concepts which are all anagrammatized and embedded into the so-called "Greek" word GEWLOGIA. As you can see, GEOLOGY is neither English nor Greek.  It is manufactured from Turkish.



You also said:
 

"In European languages ter, terra, etc. that have the meaning of earth, soil, etc. are related to Arabic "thera" (earth) and Turkic *dher > yer (earth).  English Earth, and Arabic Ardh (earth) are nothing but metatheses of "Ter", where T  stands for the vector {dh, th (as in "thing"), th (as in "this", y).  Turkish ser- (spread), ter-/ der- (gather)....  Of course, Turkic tor/toz (dust), topak/toprak (soil), and Arabic turab/turba(t) are related to this ancient "Ter" too.  Are these due to genetics or early loans, I don't know."


Polat Kaya:  I disagree with you regarding all you said above.  Latin TERRA, if anything, is the other way around. 

Latin TERRA is made up from Turkish "YERTIR" (YERDIR) meaning "it is the earth, soil".  In this anagrammatization, the Turkish Y is intentionally dropped.  But it is visible in the Spanish TIERA.

Spanish TIERA meaning "terra", when rearranged as "IERTA" is the disguised Turkish expression "YERDI" meaning "it is soil, it is ground, it is earth".

Latin TERRESTRIS meaning "earthly" is even more interesting.  TERRESTRIS, rearranged as "IER-SE-TSTER-R", is from Turkish "YER SU TAŞTIR" meaning "it is soil, water and stone" which is a very accurate description of the earth in Turkish.  

English EARTH is an altered and disguised form of the Turkish expression "YERTI" (YERDI) meaning "it is the soil", "it is the earth".

English DUST, rearranged as "TUSD" is the altered Turkish word "TOZDU" meaning "it is dust".

Arabic "TURAB meaning "soil", rearranged as "TUBRA" is the altered and disguised form of the Turkish word "TOPRAH" (TOPRAK) meaning "soil".

As you can see, none of these words are coming from TER but, rather, they are all secretly derived from Turkish "YER" and "YERDI" (YERTI, YERTIR).  This secret is not a secret any more!

Thus you are not correct on any of them.  They are not genetics nor are they loans.  They are all sourced from Turkish and then restructured and disguised by way of alteration - after being stolen. 

So you need to study all the things I have been saying very carefully - and with attention. Then I feel confident that you will start seeing correctly what I have been saying.


Saglikli ve mutlu günler dilegi ile,

Polat Kaya

20/08/2008




Turhan Tisinli wrote:
 

All the occurances of "corpates" and "korpat" in the article below should be changed to "coprates" and "koprat" respectively.

 

Also let me add the following piece of information:

 

In European languages ter, terra, etc. that have the meaning of earth, soil, etc. are related to Arabic "thera" (earth) and Turkic *dher > yer (earth).  English Earth, and Arabic Ardh (earth) are nothing but metatheses of "Ter", where T  stands for the vector {dh, th (as in "thing"), th (as in "this", y).  Turkish ser- (spread), ter-/ der- (gather)....  Of course, Turkic tor/toz (dust), topak/toprak (soil), and Arabic turab/turba(t) are related to this ancient "Ter" too.  Are these due to genetics or early loans, I don't know.

 

Esenlikler

 

Turhan Tisinli  

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Turhan Tisinli" <tisinli@...>

To: <bcn_2004@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 6:35 PM

Subject: Re: [bcn2004] Words under the lens: "APOCALYPTIC", "ESCHATOLOGY", "SCATOLOGY", "ALLEGORIKOS" and "ALLEGORIKON"


 


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Polat Kaya" <
tntr@...>
To: <
bcn_2004@yahoogroups.com>; <Polat_Kaya@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2008 1:04 PM
Subject: Re: [bcn2004] Words under the lens: "APOCALYPTIC", "ESCHATOLOGY", "SCATOLOGY", "ALLEGORIKOS" and "ALLEGORIKON"


>  Sayin Turhan Tisinli bey,

> [...]
> National Geographic magazine, February 2001, Article on MARS, pages 
> 30-51.  On page 41, you will find the following writing, (you can check 
> this on your own):
> 
> "Discovery of the newly seen layers, says Mike Malin, "is the most 
> surprising result of our camera experiments - and the most profound.  
> "Scientists dream of robots and even humans having the chance to 
> investigate areas such as COPRATES CHASMA (7).  Using images from Viking 
> (below) to pinpoint a site to photograph, Surveyor's scientific team 
> detected multiple layers on the slopes of a mesa (close up at right), a 
> tantalizing record of Mars's dynamic past."
> 
> In the article they are observing and talking about a "land slide" 
> situation which they have named as COPRATES CHASMA 


No! "corpates chasma" does not mean landslide, it is the name of the a Martian feature that has a landslide in it. "Corpates" is said to be the old name of the Persian river Ab-i-Diz, and Latin "chasma" is from Greek "khasma" (yawning hollow, gulf).

I bet what gave you this idea is the word "corpat"es  / "korpat"  X Turkish "toprak" (soil)  (i.e. a result of interchanginhg the first sound of a word by the last sound, which is fairly common.  Even some Turkic dialects change this to "torpak". it is possible that the origin is "torpak" rather than "toprak", because "tor" can easily be related to "toz" (dust), "tuz" (salt), and even to "dur" (stand still) (all "settle"...).  [ r > z sound change which is not caused by any priests is possible in Turkish :-)]   Arabic turba and tura:b mean soil too.  If "corpates" had a suitable meaning that could be related to "soil", then it would be  possible to argue that these words have the same origin, either therough genetic relations, or being a loan, etc.  Old Persian "corpates" can be thought of as "toprak su", and this is nothing but a wild guess too... :) 


Turkish "toprak kayması" is meant to translate the American technical term "lanslide" (1856 A.D.) (Brithish "landslip") which is fairly new.  Geology itself was "invented" in England by a civil engineer called James Hutton (1726-1797).  Now let's remember that seeing an apple fall from the tree is not the same as understanding its and expressing it in a mathematical formula, and giving it a name...
 


> on Mars. It is very 
> ineteresting and enlightening that when the name COPRATES is rearraanged 
> as "TOPRAC-SE", it reveals itself as the Turkish word "TOPRAK".  
> Additionally, when the word CHASMA is rearranged as "CAHMAS" where the 
> bogus letter H is an I, it reveals itself as the altered and disguised 
> form of the Turkish expression "KAYMASI". 
> 
> As a linguist, you can see for yourself and recognize that this .
> so-called "COPRATES CHASMA" is nothing but the altered and disguised 
> form of the Turkish expression "TOPRAK KAYMASI" meaning "land slide".  I 
> doubt that you or any other linguist would have been able to recognize 
> this deceptive word "COPRATES CHASMA" as being made up from Turkish 
> "TOPRAK KAYMASI".  Evidently this successful deception and word 
> generation is being carried out by some very secretive group(s). I ask 
> you now, what do you make of this sophisticated looking so-called 
> Indo-European "name" on MARS?  Would you not think that their hands are 
> still in the cookie-jar of the Turkish language? 


Again, no!  They could have used phrases from their own languages to form a name for the Martian feature, and they did...  This is because the words "coprates" and "chasma" existed before they became parts of this name.  And, even if you are right about that the name "coprates chasma" meant "lansslide", they could still have used a phrase from their own languages to form the name...  Here is how:  "landslide" > [ using an anagramatizing algorithm] > "sendadill".  Any objections to this  "sendadill"  !? :-)  And the Brithish conterpart "landslip" would yield something like "sendapill" or sandipall...:-). Any objections to this one?  If not,  you should drop your claim that "and their hands are still in the cookie-jar of the Turkish language".


Esenlikler

Turhan Tisinli