Re: [hrl_2] Turkish Theory and the search for evidence

Hi, David,

You said:
 

"I would like to see more examples of transposition (which is one type of anagramatization)."

Polat Kaya:  Here is a list of English words that are simple transpositions of Turkish words:

DO  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word ET meaning "
to do, to make". 

CHOICE
  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word SEÇI meaning "choice".  Note that CHOICE is actually vocalized as CHOYS where the second C is voiced as S. 

CHOOSE  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "SEÇ" meaning 
"choose".

DELAY  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word  "EYLEDI" meaning 
"delayed".

LAKE  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word  "GÖL" meaning 
"lake".

LATER  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word  "ERTELE" meaning "delay or do later".

LEAP  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word  "HOPLA" (OPLA) meaning 
"leap". 

LOOT  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "TALA" meaning 
"loot" or  "steal". 

LOT  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "DOLU" meaning 
"a lot" or  "plenty". 

OILY  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "YALI" (YAGLI) meaning "oily".

MUCUS is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "SÜMÜK" meaning 
"the thick, slippery matter of the nose".

NEW  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "YENÜ" (YENI) meaning "new". 

TOOL  is the disguised transposition of Turkish word "ALET" meaning 
"tool".

WITCH   is the disguised transposition of Turkish word
  "CADU" (CADI) meaning "witch".

THATCH   is the disguised transposition of Turkish word
  "ÇATI" meaning "roof" and also "OT-ÇATI" meaning "grass roofing".


For added measure, I also give you the Latin word ANNUS meaning 
"year" which is really the disguised transposition of Turkish word "SENE" meaning "year".  This Turkish word "SENE" was also used to manufacture French word "ANNEE", Greek word "KHSONIA", Italian word "ANNO", Spanish "ANOS" and the English word "ANNUAL" - as a few examples.


You said:
 

"Turkish 'evli' "married" could possibly be related to 'love', but 'love' comes from Ancient Hebrew 'lb' "love" where /b/ > /v/."

Polat Kaya:  Turkish EVLI comes from Turkish "EV" meaning "house, home"  plus the suffix "-LI" meaning "with".  Thus "EVLI" means "with home".  This describes married couples who make up a home, that is, a family.  Additionally, there is the Turkish verb EVLENMEK (EV-LEN-MEK) meaning "to get married" and "to get a house and family"  Thus, Turkish EVLI does not come from LOVE.  It definitely does not come from LB.   LB , just like KL,  is not a word.   When vowels are introduced to this 2-consonant LB, then many words can be made.  I thought we settled this last time in my response to you regarding "KL" to which you said "Thank you for correcting me".

As for the English term LOVE, it is the altered and disguised Turkish word "ALEV" meaning 
"flame, fire, burning".  Those who are in love are "inflamed towards each other".  That is why we have expressions such as "Who is your new flame?", or "burning love", etc..  


Best wishes to you and to all, 

Polat Kaya

27/02/2008


 


David L wrote:
 

More questions:
I would like to see more examples of transposition (which is one type of anagramatization).
Latin 'pot' is a root that means "drink" but it is not related to 'top'.
It is possible that it is related to 'tap' which has to do with fluid flow. I am not saying it is, and I am not trying to speculate, only to consider and search.
Turkish 'evli' "married" could possibly be related to 'love', but 'love' comes from Ancient Hebrew 'lb' "love" where /b/ > /v/.
If we had straight forward correspondences between two languages where we had two matching consonants in each, then we would need a minimum of 4 correspondences for evidence to be considered significant.
If we are dealing with transpositions then I would like to see at least 8 correspondences between two languages. If we only had at most 2 or 3 transpositions between any two languages (Turkish being the language compared) then we may not have enough for a proof. For anagrams we need much more in the number of correspondences for proof between two languages.
The anagrams which are not simple transpositions, are much more difficult to analyze. So I would like to see as many (or 8 or more) transpositions between Turkish and another language. If I see those and they check well, then I will look at anagrams between Turkish and the same language. Then we will be able to establish a language relationship that scholars have overlooked, and such a discovery would be very exciting.
Now it is true, that it is possible that there are language relationships which have been so obscured (made hidden) that statistical analysis can not prove that there is a relation, even though there is. But it is important to know what kind of evidence you have and weather to classify the evidence as part of a proof, or part of a theory.
If I only see a few words between Turkish and Greek and a few between Turkish and English, etc., then I don't know where all of the other millions and millions of words have come from in all the world's languages, and then I would not have enough evidence to suggest Turkish is the original language.
I am not doubting that there are transpositions and anagrams (morphological rearrangement correspondences) from Turkish to other languages, but I need to see more evidence to know the magnitude of it.
I am trying to help with how evidence is presented, because I think this will help me, and help you in advancing your work, Mr. Kaya.
Or may be between two languages there can be shown:
3 regular correspondences
5 transposed correspondences
7 morphologically rearranged correspondences
etc...
Dave