Re: [bcn2004] JOHN & IVAN ...there were not separate symbols for J versus I, nor for I versus U

Please do not forget to add to the list the Turkish names CAN and
AYHAN (AY-HAN). These two Turkish names are at the roots of all those
that
appear in the postings given below.

Best wishes to all,

Polat Kaya



Kamil KARTAL wrote:
>
> Harlan Messinger wrote:
>
> >
> > Similarly with Latin "Johannes" > Jan and Johann and Hans and (I
> assume) Jochen in the various Germanic languages, John in English,
> Spanish Juan,
> >
> >
>
> In earlier variants of the Roman alphabet's usage, there were not
> separate symbols for J versus I, nor for I versus U. Thus there is a
> nice portrait of Saint John by El Greco, where he has labeled it
> in Spanish using capital letters "IVAN", to represent what today
> would normally be "Juan". The fun with that is that we represent
> the Russian version of this name as "Ivan", which in pronunciation
> is quite different from the Spanish. Of course the Russians might
> prefer to print it something like "IBAH". Please don't try to confuse
> me more!
>
> Jack
>
> Iskiri limbadzus este saBiDoria
>
> >
> > Italian Giovanni and Gianni, French Jean, Portuguese Joćo, Catalan
> Joan, Irish Sean, Scots Gaelic Ian (or other spellings), Welsh Evan
> (or other spellings), etc. Not to mention the feminine forms: English
> Joan and Johanna and Jean(ne), French Jeanne, Spanish Juana, Irish
> Siobhan (where the Latin /h/ has morphed into /v/, just like in
> Italian Giovanni), etc. None of which are related to Jonathan, by the
> way.
> >
> >
>
> URL:
>
> 
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